Although gifted in the language of photojournalism, Peter Marlow (1952 – 2016) was not a photojournalist. He was initially, however, one of the most enterprising and successful young British news photographers, and in 1976 joined the Sygma agency in Paris. He soon found that he lacked the necessary appetite for the job while on assignment in Lebanon and Northern Ireland during the late 1970s; he discovered that the stereotype of the concerned photojournalist disguised the disheartening reality of dog-eat-dog competition between photographers hunting fame at all costs.

After those days, Marlow’s aesthetic shifted – in that he made mainly color photographs – but his approach was unchanged. The color of incidental things became central to his pictures in the same way that the shape and mark of things had been central to his black-and-white work.

Marlow had come full circle. He started his career as an international photojournalist, returned to Britain to examine his own experience, and discovered a new visual poetry that enabled him to understand his homeland. Having found this poetry, he took it back on the road: he photographed as much in Japan, the USA and elsewhere in Europe as he did in the UK.

 

1 kunstwerken gevonden
The Danish Artist, Olafur Eliasson’s installation of a huge artificial sun in the Turbin Hall, Tate Modern, London, Great Britain, 2003.

The Danish Artist, Olafur Eliasson’s installation of a huge artificial sun in the Turbin Hall, Tate Modern, London, Great Britain, 2003.

1 kunstwerken gevonden
×

Art alert

Met de Art Alert blijft u automatisch op de hoogte als wij nieuwe werken van uw favoriete kunstenaars op deze website publiceren! Als u een account registreert kunt u uw Art Alert voorkeuren beheren.

Lees meer

Inloggen

code